Edgar M.*, Hanington P., Lu R., Proctor H., Zurawell R., Kimmel N. and M.S. Poesch (2022) The First Documented Occurrence and Life History Characteristics of the Chinese Mystery Snail (Cipangopaludina chinensis, Mollusca: Viviparidae) in Alberta, Canada. BioInvasions Records.

Citation: Edgar M.*, Hanington P., Lu R., Proctor H., Zurawell R., Kimmel N. and M.S. Poesch (2022) The First Documented Occurrence and Life History Characteristics of the Chinese Mystery Snail (Cipangopaludina chinensis, Mollusca: Viviparidae) in Alberta, Canada. BioInvasions Records. 

Abstract

 The Chinese mystery snail Cipangopaludina fhinensis (Gray, 1834), a species native to Asia, is documented for the first time in Alberta, Canada, in McGregor Lake Reservoir in 2019. Here, we describe the initial finding of C. chinensis in Alberta, Canada, and biological information that may aid management efforts. Collected specimens were confirmed as C. chinensis through DNA barcoding. Analysis of growth rate, fecundity, and infection by digenean trematodes was assessed. It is unknown how C. chinensis arrived in Alberta. However, this species’ ability to withstand environmental stressors, such as desiccation, facilitates overland and long-distance transport via recreationists or deliberate release of C. chinensis into waterbodies. Snails collected from McGregor Lake Reservoir matched with GenBank results for C. chinensis from Korea. Analysis of digenean trematodes revealed that the population in McGregor Lake are not infected, as there were no cercariae present after 24 hours. Growth assessment over a period of 60 weeks revealed that shell length growth quickly outpaces growth in shell width. Upon emergence, C. chinensis are larger than many native snail species. The expansion of C. chinensis into Alberta poses potential negative consequences, such as decreased native snail biomass, increased nitrogen to phosphorus ratios, and additive impacts when paired with other invasive species.

*Lab members: Megan Edgar and Mark Poesch. Check out opportunities in the lab!

Firth, B., Poesch, M.S., Koops, M., Power, M. and D.A.R. Drake. (2021) Diet overlap of common and at-risk riverine benthic fishes before and after Round Goby (Neogobius melanostomus) invasion. Biological Invasions 23(1): 1-14.

Citation: Firth, B., Poesch, M.S., Koops, M., Power, M. and D.A.R. Drake. (2021) Diet overlap of common and at-risk riverine benthic fishes before and after Round Goby (Neogobius melanostomus) invasion. Biological Invasions 23(1): 1-14. 

Abstract

Round Goby (Neogobius melanostomus) has invaded high diversity tributaries of the Laurentian Great Lakes, including those supporting multiple species of conservation concern. The extent and magnitude of ecological impacts on benthic riverine fishes is poorly understood, especially changes in dietary overlap and feeding strategy. We used a before-after study design to examine the impact of Round Goby on native benthic riverine fishes, including the Threatened Eastern Sand Darter (Ammocrypta pellucida) in the Sydenham River, Ontario, Canada. To evaluate shifts in diet overlap and feeding strategy, fishes were collected with multiple gears and the direct (diet overlap with the invader) and potential indirect (diet overlap among the native benthic fishes) impacts of Round Goby were assessed. Before the arrival of Round Goby, there were a total of 6 ecologically significant diet overlaps among the studied native benthic fishes. Following the arrival of Round Goby, there were 20 ecologically significant diet overlaps, with 6 out of 8 species, including Eastern Sand Darter, showing significant diet overlap with Round Goby. Fishes exhibiting significant dietary overlap with Round Goby shifted feeding strategies to become more specialized, a change in feeding consistent with potential competitive effects. Although the long-term consequences of invasion-induced dietary and feeding shifts remain poorly understood, increased competitive interactions suggested by dietary overlap may be occurring between Round Goby and native benthic riverine fishes and may exacerbate the observed declines of native species.

Card, J.*, Hasler, C., Ruppert, J.*Donadt, C.* and M.S. Poesch. (2020) A three-pass electrofishing removal strategy is not effective for eradication of Prussian Carp in a North American stream network. Journal of Fish and Wildlife Management 11(2): 485-493.

Citation: Card, J., Hasler, C., Ruppert, J., Donadt, C.* and M.S. Poesch. (2020) A three-pass electrofishing removal strategy is not effective for eradication of Prussian Carp in a North American stream network. Journal of Fish and Wildlife Management 11(2): 485-493. 

Abstract

Prussian Carp Carassius gibelio, also referred to as Gibel Carp, is a destructive aquatic invasive species, recently, found in Alberta Canada. Three-pass electrofishing is a potential approach to control some aquatic invasive fish species in stream habitats. The objectives of this study were to: 1) determine the efficacy of this strategy to control Prussian Carp in connected streams; and, 2) assess whether removal success was influenced by population size or the distance to the introduction site. We sampled sites using electrofishing in tributaries of the Red Deer River in both the summer and fall. Prussian Carp were detected at all sites prior to removal, with > 90 % probability of detection of this species within the first 120 m of electroshocking efforts. Overall, removal was deemed unsuccessful. We found that abundances of Prussian Carp were significantly higher post-removal. Removal success was significantly related to distance to the introduction site, suggesting that removal may be useful in targeted situations close to the edge of the invasion front. Additional removal and control strategies are needed by managers.

Highlighted in media (link here)

*Lab members:  Jamie Card, Jonathan Ruppert, Caitlyn Donadt and  Mark Poesch. Check out opportunities in the lab!

Ruppert, J.L.W.*, Docherty,C.*, Rudolfsen, T.*, Neufeld, K.*, Hamilton, K.*, MacPherson, L. and M.S. Poesch. (2017) Native North American freshwater species get out of the way: Prussian Carp (Carassius gibelio) establishment impacts both fish and macroinvertebrate communities. Royal Society Open Science 4: 170400.

Citation: Ruppert, J.L.W.*, Docherty,C.*, Rudolfsen, T.*, Neufeld, K.*, Hamilton, K.*, MacPherson, L. and M.S. Poesch. (2017) Native North American freshwater species get out of the way: Prussian Carp (Carassius gibelio) establishment impacts both fish and macroinvertebrate communities. Royal Society Open Science 4: 170400.

Abstract

Prussian carp (Carassius gibelio) are one of the most noxious non-native species in Eurasia. Recently, Prussian carp, a nonnative freshwater fish species, were genetically confirmed in Alberta, Canada and have been rapidly expanding their range in North America since establishment. Given their rapid range expansion, there is an increasing need to determine how Prussian carp may impact native species. We assessed the severity of the Prussian carp invasion by (i) determining their impact on fish communities, (ii) assessing their impact on benthic invertebrate communities, (iii) evaluating if Prussian carp alter abiotic conditions, and (iv) identifying where we find higher abundances of Prussian carp. When Prussian carp were established, we found significant changes to the fish community. Correspondingly, the degree of impact to benthic invertebrate communities was related to the stage of invasion (none, early or recent), where changes in fish communities were significantly concordant with changes in benthic invertebrate communities. Finally, we found that higher abundances of Prussian carp were significantly associated with lower abundances of a majority of native fish species. Altogether, using three lines of evidence, we determine that Prussian carp can have wide-ranging impacts on freshwater ecosystems in North America, pressing the need for management intervention.

*Lab members: Jonathan RuppertCassandra DochertyTyana RudolfsenKenton NeufeldKyle HamiltonMark Poesch. Check out opportunities in the lab!

Docherty, C.*, Ruppert, J.*, Rudolfsen, T.*, Hamann, A., and Poesch, M.S. (2017) Assessing the spread and potential impact of Prussian Carp (Carassius gibelio Bloch, 1782) to freshwater fishes in western North America. BioInvasions Records 6: 291-296.

Citation: Docherty, C.*, Ruppert, J.*, Rudolfsen, T.*, Hamann, A., and Poesch, M.S. 2017. Assessing the spread and potential impact of Prussian Carp (Carassius gibelio Bloch, 1782) to freshwater fishes in western North America. BioInvasions Records 6: 291-296.

Abstract

Prussian Carp (Carassius gibelio Bloch, 1782) is one of the most successful invasive species in Eurasia. Recently, Prussian Carp were genetically confirmed in Alberta, Canada, documenting the first detection of this species in North America. Given the close morphological similarity to their sister species, the Goldfish (Carassius auratus Linnaeus, 1758), it is likely that this species has been undetected for some time. We document the spread of Prussian Carp since arrival (circa 2000), and contribute a trait-based risk assessment to potential recipient communities in western North America. Using a meta-analysis of geo-referenced fisheries data in conjunction with original sampling in 2014, we show that the Prussian Carp range has increased by eight- to eleven-fold over 15 years in Alberta at a rate of approximately 233–1,250 km2 per year. Range expansions in the near future are possible through the Saskatchewan River drainage and south into the Missouri River basin, with easily accessible routes to Midwestern North America through irrigation canals. We show high life history trait overlap with other successful invasive species, such as Goldfish and Common Carp (Cyprinus carpio Linnaeus, 1758). Additionally, there was high life history trait overlap with several species of native sunfish (Centrarchidae) and suckers (Catostomidae). This study highlights Prussian Carp’s potential to widely impact North American freshwater ecosystems and to successfully compete with native taxa. Considered one of the worst invaders in Eurasia, the arrival of Prussian Carp in North America poses serious concern for fisheries managers. There is an urgent need to develop management plans before further range expansion and disruption of freshwater ecosystems by this new invasive species.

*Lab members: Cassandra DochertyJonathan RuppertTyana RudolfsenMark Poesch. Check out opportunities in the lab!

Spread of Prussian Carp in Alberta, Canada

Poesch, M.S., Dextrase, A.J., Schwalb, A.N., and J. Ackerman (2010) Secondary invasion of the round goby into high diversity Great Lakes tributaries and species at risk hotspots: Potential new concerns for endangered freshwater species. Biological Invasions 12: 1269-1284.

Citation: Poesch, M.S., Dextrase, A.J., Schwalb, A.N., and Ackerman, J. 2010. Secondary invasion of the round goby into high diversity Great Lakes tributaries and species at risk hotspots: Potential new concerns for endangered freshwater species. Biological Invasions 12: 1269-1284. 

Abstract

The round goby (Neogobius melanostomus) first invaded North America in 1990 when it was discovered in the St. Clair River. Despite more than 15 years of potential invasion, many Great Lakes’ lotic systems remained uninvaded. Recently, we captured the round goby from several Great Lakes tributaries known as species-at-risk hotspots. With a combination of field sampling of round gobies and literature review of the impact of round gobies on native taxa, we assess the potential impacts of the secondary invasion to native species using three mechanisms: competition; predation; and indirect impacts from the loss of obligate mussel hosts. We estimate that 89% (17/19) of benthic fishes and 17% (6/36) of mussels that occur in these systems are either known or suspected to be impacted by the secondary invasion of round goby. In particular, we note that the distribution of potential impacts of round goby invasion was largely associated with species with a conservation designation, including seven endangered species (1 fish, 6 mussels). As these recent captures of round goby represent novel occurrences in high diversity watersheds, understanding the potential impacts of secondary invasion to native biota is fundamental to prevent species declines and to allow early mitigation.

Featured In: Fisheries 34(9): 421 (Link), & several media outlets.

Scott, R.J., Poesch, M.S., Noakes, D.L.G., and F.W.H. Beamish (2005) Effects of exotic salmonids on juvenile Atlantic salmon behavior. Ecology of Freshwater Fish 14: 283-288.

Citation: Scott, R.J., Poesch, M.S., Noakes, D.L.G., & Beamish, F.W.H. 2005. Effects of exotic salmonids on juvenile Atlantic salmon behavior. Ecology of Freshwater Fish 14: 283-288.

Abstract

We examined the effects of two salmonid species, chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tschwaytscha) and brown trout (Salmo trutta), both exotic species to Lake Ontario, on behaviour and foraging success of juvenile Atlantic salmon (S. salar), a native species to Lake Ontario, in an artificial stream. We found that both exotic species have effects on Atlantic salmon behaviour, but that neither had an effect on foraging success. These results may explain why the Atlantic salmon re-introduction programme in Lake Ontario has had little success, as more than 3 million exotic salmonids are released in Lake Ontario streams annually.